This simple message can be the first step toward a more inclusive site.

The need for accessible websites is on the rise, and companies are finally starting to notice. Making a site accessible requires leadership, professional insight, and a supportive culture. But there is a quick, easy first step that does not require a developer or leadership buy-in: the accessibility statement.

Making a statement

Scroll down to the footer of your favorite eCommerce site, and you may now see a link called “accessibility.” This link may lead to its own page, the customer service page, or the website terms page. …


Are you a unicorn or just a troll?

Illustration by Olga Yatsenko on Shutterstock.com

A few years ago when I began the transition from web design to user experience design, I saw a lot of contention over the definition of a UX professional. There was a never ending laundry list of things that I needed to know to be a “real UX person” (research! content design! design systems! visual design! HTML! leadership!)

As soon a I finished a course or a project in one discipline, I would find another requirement, and I was left to wonder when I would become an official UX designer. …


A woman engages in lots of daily activities — cooking, bathing, resting, reading, and gardening.
A woman engages in lots of daily activities — cooking, bathing, resting, reading, and gardening.

I admit. I’ve been following celebrity stories more during COVID-19 lockdown. It might be boredom — perhaps it’s just the subtle reminder that someone out there is making worse choices than I am. Although most celebrities are making expected mistakes (like bemoaning isolation in their lavish mansions) I did not expect any of them to make a design blunder.

Here We Go Again

Amanda Seyfried, the star of the movie adaptations of Mamma Mia and Les Misérables, puzzled fans on April 8 when she posted this picture to her Instagram stories.


Online quizzes are everywhere, but are they a good customer experience?

A neon sign that says “Quiz Night”, over a cityscape at night.
A neon sign that says “Quiz Night”, over a cityscape at night.
Photo by Soifer on Shutterstock.com

Quizzes are special to ’90s kids like me. As soon as I could read, I used magazines in the pediatrician’s office to find out important facts like what my ideal pet is or what kind of sandwich I would be. Later, these turned into forwarded email chains and sprawling Facebook posts with complete personality matrices. (This was back in the days before privacy and data sharing were a hot topic. If my high school best friend dug up her old emails, she could probably steal my identity.)

Nowadays quizzes are a way of life on the Internet — there are…


A lawyer, a UX designer, and a pizza delivery person walk into a bar…

Courtroom Illustration with a witness, a panel of judges, and a jury.
Courtroom Illustration with a witness, a panel of judges, and a jury.
Photo by MicroOne on Shutterstock.com

Yesterday, a client sent feedback to my digital agency team about the website we are building for them. The tab focus function was broken. Could we please make sure that worked properly, for accessibility?

My team flipped out. The project manager went into a panic trying to figure out how this would impact our deadlines. The visual designer started to frantically trying to find out what color the focus box should be. The head of development recommended we try a plugin that would “take care of all that accessibility stuff for us.”

In the midst of this panic, the project…


Vintage claymation Godzilla attacking a city
Vintage claymation Godzilla attacking a city
Photo by Willrow Hood on Shutterstock.com

Have you ever started rebuilding a website and noticed that the existing site is an overgrown tangle of disjointed pathways, 404 errors, useless landing pages, and pointless interactions? Clients, partners, and fellow UXers alike can get buried under a mountain of disorganized content. Some even start a project with confidence that their templates, design system, or publication process had prevented this problem, only to be crushed when the reality sets in.

How the website had gotten so bad? Why couldn’t we just stick to the templates? What can we do so this doesn’t happen again with the next release?

It’s Alive!

When…

Amy Ackerman

UX Architect in eCommerce. I love all things content strategy, IA, and accessibility. MS UXD and CPACC.

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